Education

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Women’s education, or the lack of it, has been central to defining women’s role in the family, the workplace, and in community life. Women’s increasing access to education at all levels has been closely linked to state and local policy on public education. Women have traditionally been regarded as natural educators, a perspective which opened the way for women as public school teachers in the 19th century and also spurred women to advocate for education across class boundaries at every level. Economic class, religion, and race have played decisive role in the education received by various groups of girls and women. Women’s struggle to achieve access to education – as students, as teachers, and as public advocates for improved educational facilities – has contributed to the development of New Jersey public school systems and of private alternatives to public education. School buildings and facilities across the state bear witness to the diligence of women’s advocacy of education for themselves and their children.

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    Sparta Female Seminary

    Sussex County, Sparta Township 54 Woodport Road Sparta, NJ Private Female Seminary Schools like the Sparta Female Seminary proliferated in the 19th century to […]

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    Pierson-Sculthorp House

    Elizabeth Sculthorp Force was five years old when her family moved into this house. She continued to live here during her years as a high school teacher in Toms River where she developed an innovative curriculum in the area of social behavior and family relationships.

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    Douglass College, College Hall

    In 1918, this brown sandstone Italianate mansion now known as College Hall, formerly part of the Carpender estate, became the central home of the New Jersey College for Women, the first established public college for women in the state as a department of Rutgers College.

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    Marion Thompson Wright’s House

    Marion Thompson Wright was the first woman in the nation to become a scholar in the field of the sociology and history of African American education. Wright lived in this house while she pursued her studies at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College in New York City.

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    Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary

    Cora Hartshorn had a lifelong interest in providing a place for the public to learn about New Jersey trees, plants and wildlife in their native habitats. Cora’s father, Steward Hartshorn, founded Short Hills and she shared his passion for developing the community.

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    Ivy Hall Seminary

    Since its construction in 1791 by the prosperous landowner and gentleman farmer David Sheppard, this Federal style mansion has played a prominent role in Bridgeton. The house is an 18th century landmark in the state’s largest historic district noted for its 19th century architecture. I

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    Bancroft School (Bancroft NeuroHealth)

    Margaret Bancroft founded the Bancroft Training School in 1883. The original school building is not longer standing, but this lively Queen Anne style building is the oldest existing building associated with the school.

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    Mary Van Meter Grice House

    Mary Van Meter Grice lived in this house in Riverton for more than 20 years, from 1881-1903, while she made significant contributions to children’s education at the local and state levels. Grice was one of the founding members of a local woman’s club called The Porch Club in 1890, and became the club’s first president.

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    St. Mary’s Hall

    Bishop George Washington Doane founded St. Mary’s Hall on May 1, 1837 as an academic, private Episcopal school for girls. At that time, most schools for girls were finishing schools, not institutions like St. Mary’s where girls studied the same subjects as boys.