Voluntary Organizations and Reform Movements

Women’s voluntary organizations have been a significant force in community building, religious life, social welfare, and environmental preservation in New Jersey. Beginning in the early 19th century and continuing to the present, women have worked together, or with men, to address the cultural, social, economic and legal issues of the day. Collectively and individually women have addressed issues and public needs where government was slow to act, initiated social services, founded institutions to serve the sick and needy, and pressed for improved education and health care. Many lasting institutions in the state exist today because of leadership taken by women addressing public needs.

Showing 10 from 21 Items
  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Wallace Chapel, AME Zion Church

    Florence Spearing Randolph was an African American Methodist minister and social activist. She led the Wallace Chapel congregation from 1925 to 1946. As the congregation grew, she organized the fundraising effort for the construction of a permanent spiritual home.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    The Shakespeare Garden

    Union County, Plainfield City A project of the Plainfield Garden Club Cedar Brook Park, 121-147 Randolph Road Plainfield, NJ Open to Public For more […]

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    All Souls Unitarian Church

    Antoinette Brown Blackwell was the first woman ordained minister in the United States, a social activist, and a celebrated author and lecturer on temperance and women’s rights in New England, New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Abigail Goodwin House

    This Salem County house, at 47 Market Street was constructed in 1821, and was home to abolitionist Quakers Abigail and Elizabeth Goodwin.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Memorial Day Nursery

    The Memorial Day Nursery survives as one of the last standing legacies to Jennie Tuttle Hobart’s benevolence, and is perhaps the earliest known day care center in the United States still operating today. The architect was Henry Bacon (who designed the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C.).

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Lambert Castle Museum

    Jennie Tuttle Hobart was a prominent philanthropist, community leader and anti-suffragist. She was the wife of Garrett A. Hobart, who served as Vice President under President William McKinley.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Macculloch Hall Historical Museum

    Generations of women of the Macculloch/Miller family accomplished a great deal in the way of community service. At a time when women’s opportunities were limited, Louisa Macculloch and her descendants were involved in several community organizations promoting social and artistic causes.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Thompson Park, Brookdale Farm

    Brookdale Farm is a pivotal site in the history and development of Monmouth County, significant as an evolutionary landscape from 18th-century farm to 19th-century horse estate to 20th-century public park and for its association with horseman David Dunham Withers and social welfare reformer Geraldine Livingston Morgan Thompson.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Keyport Historical Society

    Therese Walling Seabrook lived on West Front Street overlooking the Bay. She was the wife of a prominent businessman in Keyport and an activist for women’s rights. She was a strong supporter of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and an advocate of women’s suffrage.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Shrewsbury Friends Meeting and Cemetery

    The Settlement of Quakers in the colony of New Jersey is regarded as an important contribution to a liberal tradition in the state, Quakers professed a belief in the “equality of souls,” granting women a unique role in their communities. Some women were religious speakers who traveled to meetings throughout the colony.