Work

You are here: Home  > Work
Over the centuries, women have undertaken many forms of economic work, both paid and unpaid, in addition to the work of the home and child care. The places of women’s work have included the hearth, the sick room, the threshing floor, the spinning room of an early textile mill, the school room, the department store, the factory, the commercial laundry, the front office, the laboratory, the hospital operating room, and the computer in a home office. Paid work for women has often been determined by economic class, race, educational attainment, and gender discrimination. New Jersey women’s participation in the economy has evolved from the primarily home-based work of pre-industrial society to widespread participation in the paid workforce. Today, more than half New Jersey’s women are employed outside the home, many in the “high tech” industries of computers, pharmaceuticals, trade, communications and finance, accounting for 50 percent of the state’s employment.

Showing 10 from 22 Items
  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Consumers’ Research

    M.C. Phillips, consumer advocate author, editor and manager, joined Consumers’ Research, a New York-based organization, in 1932. She married Frederick Schlink, one of its founders, that same year. One year later, the entire operation relocated to New Jersey.

  • Item thumbnail
    2

    La Voce Italiana Newspaper Office

    Mary Augusto was a journalist, community leader and the first woman mayoral candidate in Paterson. She was active from pre-WWII until her death in 1982. In the 1930s, she and her husband decided to start the Italian-language newspaper La Voce Italiana.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    The Phoenix Mill

    Paterson gained its preeminence as the “Silk City” in the later 19th century. Turn-of-the-century female silk workers were typically young, single and either immigrants or daughters of immigrants. They worked 10-hour days to contribute to the family well-being or provided the sole support for their families.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Barbour Mill Spruce Street

    By the turn of the 20th century, Paterson was a leading city in the industrial revolution, and as a consequence became a hotbed of both labor-movement reforms and disputes. Paterson’s industrial economy was dominated by textiles, especially silk, others as well as flax and linen produced by the Barbour Company.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    The Botto House

    The Botto House, the home of immigrant silk worker Maria Botto (1870-1915), became a popular meeting place for Sunday outings by fellow silk workers from nearby Paterson and a focal point for striking workers during the 1913 Paterson silk strike.

  • Item thumbnail
    0

    Double Trouble State Park

    Originally a cranberry farm and packing plant, the former company town called Double Trouble is a window into past and current industries in the Pinelands. The Double Trouble Company was formed to sell timber, millwork products and cranberries.