Army Reserve belong to the Royal Australian Army Medical Corps viagra australia online There are two types of contraceptive pills - the combined pill and the progestogen-only pill

Abolition/Gradual Manumission

1806
Certificate of Abandonment, Piscataway Township, New Jersey. This document freed a slave owner from any obligations to the child born to her slave, 1806.


1808
Manumission of Abigal,” a manuscript document freeing the slave woman Abigal in Piscataway, Middlesex County, 1808.


1828
The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


Activists

c. 1803 Hannah Kinney’s Records of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 1803-1804.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation.


1867 The Founding Convention of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1867 “Women Suffrage in New Jersey.” An address delivered by Lucy Stone, at a hearing before the New Jersey Legislature, March 6, 1867.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell,.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1915 “Passing the Suffrage Torch,” photo of suffrage campaign event, 1915.


1915 Suffragist Mina C. Van Winkle, 1915.


c. 1917 Alice Paul (1885-1979) of Moorestown, militant suffragist.


c. 1917 Alice Paul at National Woman’s Party headquarters, c. 1917.


1918 Julia Hurlbut of Morristown (1882 - 1962), suffragist and relief worker, photograph 1918.


1920 Pioneer Suffragist Casts G. O. P. Ballot. Newspaper coverage of Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s visit to the polls, 1920.


1920 New Jersey League of Women Voters, minutes of first meeting, 1920.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


1936 Invitation to attend the organizational meeting of the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1936.


1941 100 Famous Jersey Women, news article about the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1941.


1958 Dorothy Daggett Eldridge (1903-1986), the founder of the New Jersey Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986) ran as a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


Advertisements

1797 “To Be Sold,” newspaper advertisement for a slave woman, 1797.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1956 Florence Price Dwyer (1902-1976), a campaign flyer illustrating the techniques she used to appeal to voters, 1956.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986) ran as a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


1993 Christine Todd Whitmann (1946- ). Campaign flyer, “Christie Whitman’s Blueprint for a Better Education,” 1993.


African American Women

1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1797 “To Be Sold,” newspaper advertisement for a slave woman, 1797.


1808 “Manumission of Abigal,” a manuscript document freeing the slave woman Abigal in Piscataway, Middlesex County, 1808.


1806 Certificate of Abandonment, Piscataway Township, New Jersey. This document freed a slave owner from any obligations to the child born to her slave, 1806.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1822 Painting of a scrubwomen by Baroness Hyde de Neuville (Anne Marguerite Henriette de Marigny Hyde de Neuville, unknown -1849).


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


1843 Jarena Lee (1783 - unknown), the first known woman preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.


1840 “The Little Wanderer” by Esther “Hetty” Saunders, c. 1793-1862.


1867 “Women Suffrage in New Jersey.” An address delivered by Lucy Stone, at a hearing before the New Jersey Legislature, March 6th, 1867.


1918 NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, War-time Address to the 3rd annual convention, 1918.


c. 1920s Jessie Redmon Fauset (1882-1961), novelist and journalist.


1924 Street sign honoring Jazz singer, Sarah Vaughan (1924-1990), in front of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark, New Jersey.


1927 Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951). The front page of the New Jersey State Federation News, the newspaper of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, with photograph of Randolph, the founder, and a history of early years of the organization, 1927.


c. 1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


c. 1930s Marion Thompson Wright (1902-1962), an African American historian and teacher.


1932 Domestic Science Class. New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, Bordentown.


1932 New Jersey Organization of Teachers. Teachers’ organizations, such as the National Education Association, were not racially integrated until the 1950s.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


c. 1970s Helen S. Meyner (1928-1997), Congresswoman from Phillipsburg, meeting constituents, 1970s.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


1985 Helen Stummer has been documenting Newark’s Central Ward for many years. “Arnetha as a child while living in Newark,” photograph by Helen Stummer.


2000 Toni Morrison,1993 Noble Prize in Literature and 1998 Pulitzer Prize winning author.


2003 Dionne Warwick and the composer Burt Bacharach have collaborated on numerous Grammy Award-winning songs.


Agricultural Work

1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County,1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


c. 1920s Elizabeth Coleman White (1871-1954), developer of the nation’s first cultivated blueberry.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


c. 1943 Buying Victory Garden Seed, c.1943.


c. 1950s Alberta Gonzalez (1914-1996), a migrant farm worker and labor leader.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


Anti-Suffrage

1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9, 1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24,1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1915 Statement concerning the opposition of liquor interests to woman suffrage in New Jersey, Women’s Political Union.


1915 Table, “1915 Suffrage Referendum, Vote by Counties.”


1915 “Well, Boys, we saved the home,” political cartoon.


Art

Lenape Pottery Making, ca. 1000 to 1650, a modern drawing depicting Lenape women making pottery.


1776 Oil portrait of Jannetje Drummond Jannetje Vrelandt Drummond, a daughter of prosperous Dutch farmers in Bergen County, was a Loyalist during the Revolutionary War.


1779 Wax model portrait of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham by Patience Lovell Wright (1725-1786).


1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells, 1786. The text of the petition of a Bordentown sculptor and widow to the Continental Congress for relief after the Revolutionary War, May 18, 1786.


1789 Engraving, Washington’s Reception. Washington’s Reception on the Bridge at Trenton in 1789 on his way to be Inaugurated 1st President of the U.S.


1822 Painting of a scrubwomen by Baroness Hyde de Neuville (Anne Marguerite Henriette de Marigny Hyde de Neuville, unknown -1849).


1824 Charlotte Bonaparte, “View of Lebanon.”


1840 “Esther Saunders,” pencil sketch by Anne H. Denn, c.1840.


1844 Carrie Cook Sanborn, nineteenth century Quaker, artist, head of the Cedars Art Colony, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Waters.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1900 A mural, Unity, created by Violet Oakley, which decorates the Senate chamber of the Pennsylvania State Capitol.


1920 A promotional poster advertising a performance by Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968), innovative dancer and choreographer.


1927 “Queensborough Bridge,” by Elsie Driggs.

1938 American abstract painter, Suzy Frelinghuysen (1911-1988).


1965 “Displaced,” a bronze sculpture by Dorothea Greenbaum (1893 - 1986).


1985 “Arnetha as a child while living in Newark,” photograph by Helen Stummer.


1985 Jane Grey Burgio, 1981, New Jersey’s first female secretary of state, advocate of the arts.


1995 Grace Hartigan, abstract expressionist.


2001 Goddea,Tea time on Good Friday.” Photograph by Helen Stummer.


2001 Portrait of the artist Bernarda Bryson Shahn in her studio.


Asian American Women

c. 1943 Mary Yamashita Nagao, 1920-1985. Photograph at Manzanar Relocation Center, c. 1943.


top

Charity and Benevolence

c. 1803 Hannah Kinney’s Records of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 1803-1804.


1903 Headquarters of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 305 Halsey Street, Newark.


c. 1910s Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan (1825-1915), Roman Catholic religious, educator, and founder of the Sisters of Charity of New Jersey.


Child Bearing

1775 Lenape Birthing Practices Lenape Birthing Practices, 1000 -1650.


1917 Delivery Room at the Newark Maternity Hospital Delivery Room at the Newark Maternity Hospital.


1937 Constitution and Platform of the Sterilization League of NJ The Sterilization League of New Jersey was founded in 1937 by Marian Stephenson Olden (1888-1981) of Princeton.


1964 Lena Francis Edwards Dr. Edwards, a 1924 graduate of Howard University Medical School, established her long medical practice in Jersey City in 1925.


Child Labor

1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


Children

1770 Gravestone for the Infant Children of Isaac and Hannah Arnett.


1806 Certificate of Abandonment, Piscataway Township, New Jersey. This document freed a slave owner from any obligations to the child born to her slave, 1806.


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Waters.


1865 “The Tress of Golden Hair,” by Trenton poet Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899), 1865.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


c. 1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1913 “Some Things Accomplished at Whittier House” 19th annual Report of Whittier House.


1915 Whittier House Playground for children, 1915.


1915 Whittier House Kindergarten Class, 1915.


1921 Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972), an expert in scientific management.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


1993 Christine Todd Whitmann (1946-). Campaign flyer, “Christie Whitman’s Blueprint for a Better Education,” 1993.


Civil Protest

1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation. Her letter to the tax assessor, signaling her refusal to pay property taxes, 1858.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, ca. 1910.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


c. 1917 Alice Paul (1885-1979) of Moorestown, militant suffragist.


1918 Julia Hurlbut of Morristown (1882 - 1962), suffragist and relief worker, photograph 1918.


1926 Striking Woolen Workers, Passaic, 1926, a photo of three young women strikers and a police officer.


1958 Dorothy Daggett Eldridge (1903-1986), the founder of the New Jersey Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


Civil Rights

1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


c. 1943 Mary Yamashita Nagao, 1920-1985. Photograph at Manzanar Relocation Center, c. 1943.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


Civil War

1861 Grave of Annie L. Reeder (1825-1904) A nurse at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 4, 1863. Bordentown Cemetery, Bordentown, NJ.


1864 Grave of Arabella Wharton Griffith Barlow (1824-1864), Civil War Nurse. Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, New Jersey.


1864 “My Jersey Blue” by Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899).


1865 “The Tress of Golden Hair,” by Trenton poet Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899), 1865.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


Clothing

1760 Women’s Silk Ball Gown. This silk gown is an example of the elegant dresses worn on special occasions by wealthy New Jersey women after the close of the Revolutionary War.


1789 Linen and Wood Stays. Stays, sometimes called a pair of stays, were a common woman’s garment in the 18th and early 19th centuries.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Waters.


Colonial Period

c. 1600s Sarah Kiersted, 17th century, a 1936 painting of Kiersted with Chief Oratam.


1700 Deed of Purchase between Blandina Bayard and the Hackensack Indians, 1700.


1700 NJ Indian Mortar and Pestle .


1710 The Schuyler Patent These documents are early evidence of contacts between colonial women and Lenape men and women.


1753 “An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady in New York From Her Friend in the Country” by Annis Boudinot Stockton, New Brunswick, 1753


1758 “Sleep Balmy Sleep,” a poem by Annis Boudinot Stockton (1736-1801) written on the occasion of her husband’s last illness, 1758.


1760 Runaway Wives As a British colony, New Jersey was subject to English Common Law and its women, especially married women, were subject to the limitation of rights familiar to women in England.


1760 1770 Linen and Wood Stays Stays, sometimes called a pair of stays, were a common woman’s garment in the 18th and early 19th centuries.


1770 Infant Mortality. Gravestone for the Infant Children of Isaac and Hannah Arnett


1775 Diary of Jemima Condict. New Jersey Colonists sense the coming conflict with Great Britain and make preparations.


Community Activism

c. 1803 Hannah Kinney’s Records of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 1803-1804.


1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


1867 The Founding Convention of New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1897 Jennie Tuttle Hobart (1849-1941), ca. 1897, when she was Second Lady of the nation during the first administration of William McKinley.


1903 Newark Female Charitable Society, 1903.


1912 Logo of the Women’s Political Union of New Jersey, 1912.


1913 “Some Things Accomplished at Whittier House” 19th annual Report of Whittier House.


1915 “Don’t Forget the Band Concert,” photo of suffrage campaign band, 1915.


1915 “Passing the Suffrage Torch,” photo of suffrage campaign event, 1915.


1915 Suffragist petitioning a New Jersey canal worker, photograph, 1915.


1915 Suffragist poll watcher during the 1915 New Jersey referendum.


1915 Whittier House Playground for children, 1915.


1915 Whittier House Kindergarten Class, 1915.


1920 New Jersey League of Women Voters, minutes of first meeting, 1920.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


1927 Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951). The front page of the New Jersey State Federation News, the newspaper of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, with photograph of Randolph, the founder, and a history of early years of the organization, 1927.


1929 Watchtower, New Jersey State Federation of Women’s Clubs.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


c. 1950s Alberta Gonzalez (1914-1996), a migrant farm worker and labor leader.


1956 Food Relief for Striking Westinghouse Workers, 1956. A photograph of women collecting groceries for strikers.


1972 New Directions for Women, 1972. This is the front page of the second issue, published in the Fall of 1972.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


Communitarian Experiments

1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


Consumers

1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


c. 1910s Juliet Clannon Cushing, advocate of protective labor legislation for women.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


top

Disabled

1937 Constitution and Platform of the Sterilization League of New Jersey, 1937.


1962 Marie Hilson Katzenbach, (1882-1970), an advocate for education in New Jersey.


Domestic work

Lenape Birthing Practices, ca. 1000 to 1650, an illustration of a menstrual hut and other Lenape practices.


Lenape Pottery Making, ca. 1000 to 1650, a modern drawing depicting Lenape women making pottery.


1700 NJ Indian Mortar and Pestle .


1758 “Sleep Balmy Sleep,” a poem by Annis Boudinot Stockton (1736-1801) written on the occasion of her husband’s last illness, 1758.


1800 Letter from Gavin Scott of Elizabethtown to his brother in Alnwich, England, 1800.


1822 Painting of a scrubwomen by Baroness Hyde de Neuville (Anne Marguerite Henriette de Marigny Hyde de Neuville, unknown -1849).


1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1865 “The Tress of Golden Hair,” by Trenton poet Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899), 1865.


1868 Patent model for a sieve invented by Mrs. John D. Jones of Jersey City.


c. 1880s Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune (1830-1922), a novelist and writer on household management was known to readers by her pen name, “Marion Harland.”


1920 Night work for women. In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


1921 Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972), an expert in scientific management.


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


1932 Domestic science class, New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, photograph, 1932.


1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


c.1943 Buying Victory Garden Seed, c.1943.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1956 Food Relief for Striking Westinghouse Workers, 1956. A photograph of women collecting groceries for strikers.


top

Education

1837 Hannah Hoyt (1805 - 1871) In 1837, Hannah Hoyt began teaching a group of young girls in a house on lower Albany Street in New Brunswick, New Jersey.


1844 Carrie Cook Sanborn, nineteenth century Quaker, artist, head of the Cedars Art Colony, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, 1844.


1858 Eagleswood House at the Raritan Bay Union, 1858.


1860 Opheleton Seminary for Young Ladies; Plainfield, 1860.


1865 Mary Mapes Dodge (1831-1905) Tablet.


1887 New Jersey School Suffrage Act enfranchised rural and small town women in school matters, 1887.


c. 1890 Evelyn College, c. 1890, a photograph of students.


1903 College of St. Elizabeth, 1903, a photograph of the first graduating class.


1909 Ridgewood High School Women’s Basketball Team, 1909.


c. 1910s Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan (1825-1915), Roman Catholic religious, educator, and founder of the Sisters of Charity of New Jersey.


c. 1910s Florence Peshine Eagleton, (1870-1953), the first woman to serve as a trustee of Rutgers University.


1913 “Some Things Accomplished at Whittier House” 19th annual Report of Whittier House.


1915 Whittier House Kindergarten Class, 1915.


c. 1920 The Clara Barton School, Bordentown, from a postcard c. 1920.


c. 1925 Douglass College Students, c. 1925.


c. 1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


1932 New Jersey Organization of Colored Teachers Teachers’ organizations, such as the National Education Association, were not racially integrated until the 1950s.


1932 Domestic Science Class. New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, Bordentown.


1936 Invitation to attend the organizational meeting of the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1936.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


1941 100 Famous Jersey Women, news article about the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1941.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


1962 Marie Hilson Katzenbach, (1882-1970), an advocate for education in New Jersey.


1968 Science students at Felician College, 1968.


1972 Male and Female Students at Rutgers College, 1972.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


1993 Christine Todd Whitman (1946-). Campaign flyer, “Christie Whitman’s Blueprint for a Better Education,” 1993.


Employment

1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


1895 Women Insurance Workers, Newark, 1895, a photograph of policy writers at Prudential Insurance Company.


c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


1919 Women Workers at the Edison Factory during World War I supplemented the men from the workforce who were fighting in the war.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


1926 Striking Woolen Workers, Passaic, 1926, a photo of three young women strikers and a police officer.


c. 1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


1943 Women workers at the Federal Shipyard, Newark, 1943, sewing safety nets on a destroyer escort.


1944 Women in the U. S. Army, 1944, a photograph of WACs at Fort Hancock.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1963 Press Release from Representative Florence Dwyer’s Office detailing fight for Federal Equal Pay Legislation, 1963.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co. was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


Environmental Protection

1929 Watchtower, New Jersey State Federation of Women’s Clubs.


top

Factory Work

1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


1907 Working Women’s Gymnastic Club, 1907, a Paterson women silk workers’ athletic club.


c. 1910s Juliet Clannon Cushing, advocate of protective labor legislation for women.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, c. 1910.


1913 Women Silk Workers, Paterson, 1913.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1919 Women Workers at the Edison Factory during World War I supplemented the men from the workforce who were fighting in the war.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1926 Striking Woolen Workers, Passaic, 1926, a photo of three young women strikers and a police officer.


c. 1943 Mary Yamashita Nagao, 1920-1985. Photograph at Manzanar Relocation Center, c. 1943.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co. was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


Family Life

1760 Runaway Wives As a British colony, New Jersey was subject to English Common Law and its women, especially married women, were subject to the limitation of rights familiar to women in England.


1770 Gravestone for the Infant Children of Isaac and Hannah Arnett.


1800 Letter from Gavin Scott of Elizabethtown to his brother in Alnwich, England, 1800.


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Waters.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, c. 1910.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1917 Delivery room at Newark After World War I, especially in urban areas, pregnant women increasingly opted for giving birth under the care of a female or male physician in a hospital, rather than at home attended by a midwife or family doctor.


1921 Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972), an expert in scientific management.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


c. 1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


Feminism

1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library, 1923.


1936 Invitation to attend the organizational meeting of the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1936.


1941 100 Famous Jersey Women, news article about the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1941.


c. 1970s Helen S. Meyner (1928-1997), Congresswoman from Phillipsburg, meeting constituents, 1970s.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of archers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986), ran a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


1972 New Directions for Women, 1972. This is the front page of the second issue, published in the Fall of 1972.


Friendship

1753 An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady “An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady in New York From Her Friend in the Country” by Annis Boudinot Stockton, New Brunswick, 1753.


top

Girlhood

1753, “An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady...1753” This poem was written by Annis Boudinot ( 1736-1801) at the age of 16. She wrote in the neoclassical style that was popular in 18th century England. Annis grew up as the privileged daughter of prosperous descendants of French Huguenots.


1760 - 1770 Linen and Wood Stays Stays, sometimes called a pair of stays, were a common woman’s garment in the 18th and early 19th centuries


1789 Engraving, Washington Reception. In April of 1789, George Washington traveled from Mount Vernon, his home in Virginia, to New York City where he was to be inaugurated the first president of the United States.


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804. They, however, were not positively affected by the law.


1840 Esther “Hetty” Sanders “The Little Wanderer” by Esther “Hetty” Saunders, c. 1793-1862.


1860 Opheleton Seminary for Young Ladies; Plainfield, 1860.


1869 Strawberry Fields (forever) This 1869 newspaper engraving shows women, children, and men at work picking strawberries for William Parry of Cinnaminson.


1885 Morris Canal Workers Entire families lived and worked on the shipping boats that plied the Morris Canal between Phillipsburg and Jersey City after the canal was opened as a major commercial route in the 1830s.


1892 Bessie Holmes Moore Described as the “little girl from New Jersey”, 16-year-old Bessie Moore of Ridgewood was a newcomer to national lawn tennis competition in 1892 .


1909 Ridgewood High School Basketball Women’s basketball became a popular sport for high school girls in the early twentieth century.


1920 Nightwork for Women In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


1920 Day Rest after Night Work The photo, right, is an ironic commentary on women factory workers’ “double day” of work at home and at the mill, showing the demanding amount of housework to be done after working the night shift in a mill.


1926 Striker’s Children Kitchen On January 25, 1926, six thousand workers struck the Botany Mill in Passaic.


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


1932 Domestic science class, New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, photograph, 1932.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms The Consumers’ League of New Jersey investigated child labor in New Jersey as early as 1905.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom School segregation in New Jersey was outlawed in 1947 under Article I of the newly ratified New Jersey Constitution.


1970 Women’s March for Equality On August 26, 1970, the 50th anniversary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote, women all across the state marched to show their support for feminist initiatives for women’s rights.


1993 Christie Whitman Christine Todd Whitman, (1946- ), a Republican from Somerset County, is the first woman to be elected to the governorship of New Jersey.


Government, Appointees

c. 1600s Sarah Kiersted, 17th century, a 1936 painting of Kiersted with Chief Oratam.


1920 Jury of Women, Newark, 1920.


1943 Ruth Cheney Streeter (1895-1990), the first director of the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve, in military uniform, 1943.


1962 Marie Hilson Katzenbach, (1882-1970), an advocate for education in New Jersey.


1981 Jane Grey Burgio, 1981, New Jersey’s first female secretary of state.


1995 Hon. Marie L. Garibaldi (1934-), the first woman to serve as a New Jersey Supreme Court Judge.


Oscar-winning actress Celeste Holm (1919- ) has had a long and productive career in theatre motion pictures and television.


Government, Legislative

1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells, 1786. The text of the petition of a Bordentown sculptor and widow to the Continental Congress for relief after the Revolutionary War, May 18, 1786.


1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1852 Married Women’s Property Act, 1852. This was the first New Jersey law reforming married women’s property rights.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1867 “Women Suffrage in New Jersey.” An address delivered by Lucy Stone, at a hearing before the New Jersey Legislature, March 6th, 1867.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. A letter on woman suffrage and property rights, 1868.


1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9,1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24,1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1887 New Jersey School Suffrage Act, enfranchises rural and small town women in school matters, 1887.


1920 Night work for women. In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


1920 State of New Jersey Senate Concurrent Resolution, No. 1 ratifying the 19th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution granting woman suffrage. 1920.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


1997 The New Jersey Women's Environmental Health Act is introduced to the 105th New Jersey Congress to research the causes of breast cancer in women.


top

Health Care

Lenape Birthing Practices, ca. 1000 to 1650, an illustration of a menstrual hut and other Lenape practices.


c. 1850s Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887), an internationally celebrated reformer of care for the mentally ill.


c. 1901 Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901), heroic nurse who lost her life in the battle to eradicate yellow fever.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


1937 Constitution and Platform of the Sterilization League of New Jersey, 1937.


c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


1997 The New Jersey Women's Environmental Health Act is introduced to the 105th New Jersey Congress to research the causes of breast cancer in women.


Health Reform

c. 1850s Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887), an internationally celebrated reformer of care for the mentally ill.


1937 Constitution and Platform of the Sterilization League of New Jersey, 1937.


Higher Education

c. 1890 Evelyn College, c. 1890, a photograph of students.


1903 College of St. Elizabeth, 1903, a photograph of the first graduating class.


c. 1910s Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan (1825-1915), Roman Catholic religious, educator, and founder of the Sisters of Charity of New Jersey.


c. 1910s Florence Peshine Eagleton, (1870-1953), the first woman to serve as a trustee of Rutgers University.


c. 1925 Douglass College Students, c. 1925.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


c. 1930s Marion Thompson Wright (1902-1962), an African American historian and teacher.


1937 Dorothy Cross (1906-1974), an expert on the Delaware Indians and Jersey archeology. Photographed here in 1937.


1968 Science students at Felician College, 1968.


1972 Male and Female Students at Rutgers College, 1972.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


Hispanic Americans

c. 1950s Alberta Gonzalez (1914-1996), a migrant farm worker and labor leader.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


Historic Sites

1776 Memorial honoring Patriotic. This memorial “honoring the patriotic dead of many wars,…especially a noble woman Hannah White Arnett” was erected in 1938 in the cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth, New Jersey, by the Boudinot Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.


1924 Street sign honoring Jazz singer, Sarah Vaughan (1924-1990), in front of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark, New Jersey.


1929 Watchtower, New Jersey State Federation of Women’s Clubs.


c. 1943 Historical marker at Clara Barton’s School, Bordentown, New Jersey.


Home Economics

c. 1880s Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune (1830-1922), a novelist and writer on household management was known to readers by her pen name, “Marion Harland.”


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


1932 Domestic Science Class. New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, Bordentown.


1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


top

Illustration

Lenape Birthing Practices, ca. 1000 to 1650, an illustration of a menstrual hut and other Lenape practices.


Lenape Pottery Making, ca. 1000 to 1650, a modern drawing depicting Lenape women making pottery.


1789 Engraving of “Washington’s Reception on the Bridge at Trenton,” 1789.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


1843 Jarena Lee (1783-unknown), the first known woman preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


c. 1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


c. 1901 Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901), heroic nurse who lost her life in the battle to eradicate yellow fever.


1912 Logo of the Women’s Political Union of New Jersey, 1912.


1915 “Well, Boys, we saved the home,” political cartoon.


1920 A promotional poster advertising a performance by Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968), innovative dancer and choreographer, 1920.


Immigration

1800 Letter from Gavin Scott of Elizabethtown to his brother in Alnwich, England, 1800.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


1903 Newark Female Charitable Society, 1903.


1907 Working Women’s Gymnastic Club, 1907, a Paterson women silk workers’ athletic club.


c. 1910s Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan (1825-1915), Roman Catholic religious, educator, and founder of the Sisters of Charity of New Jersey.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, c. 1910.


1913 “Some Things Accomplished at Whittier House” 19th annual Report of Whittier House.


1915 Whittier House Playground for children, 1915.


1915 Whittier House Kindergarten Class, 1915.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


Industrial Work

1919 Women Workers at the Edison Factory during World War I supplemented the men from the workforce who were fighting in the war.


1920 Night work for women. In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


1921 Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972), an expert in scientific management.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1943 Women workers at the Federal Shipyard, Newark, 1943, sewing safety nets on a destroyer escort.


1956 Food Relief for Striking Westinghouse Workers, 1956. A photograph of women collecting groceries for strikers.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co. was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


Inventions

1868 Patent model for a sieve invented by Mrs. John D. Jones of Jersey City.


top

Labor Reform

1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1910s Juliet Clannon Cushing, advocate of protective labor legislation for women.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, c. 1910.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1920 Night work for women. In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library, 1923.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


1926 Striking Woolen Workers, Passaic, 1926, a photo of three young women strikers and a police officer.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


c. 1950s Alberta Gonzalez (1914-1996), a migrant farm worker and labor leader.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1963 Press Release from Representative Florence Dwyer’s Office detailing fight for Federal Equal Pay Legislation, 1963.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co.was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


Labor Unions

1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


c. 1910 Marietta Boggio Botto and her family, c. 1910.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1926 Striking Woolen Workers, Passaic, 1926, a photo of three young women strikers and a police officer.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


1956 Food Relief for Striking Westinghouse Workers, 1956. A photograph of women collecting groceries for strikers.


Law

c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


1920 Jury of Women, Newark, 1920.


c. 1980s Marilyn J. Morheuser (1924-1995), an influential litigator of public school finance issues.


1995 Hon. Marie L. Garibaldi (1934- ), the first woman to serve as a New Jersey Supreme Court Judge.


Legal Documents

1700 Deed of Purchase between Blandina Bayard and the Hackensack Indians, 1700.


1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells, 1786. The text of the petition of a Bordentown sculptor and widow to the Continental Congress for relief after the Revolutionary War, May 18, 1786.


1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1806 Certificate of Abandonment, Piscataway Township, New Jersey. This document freed a slave owner from any obligations to the child born to her slave, 1806.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1808 “Manumission of Abigal,” a manuscript document freeing the slave woman Abigal in Piscataway, Middlesex County, 1808.


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


1852 Married Women’s Property Act, 1852. This was the first New Jersey law reforming married women’s property rights.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. A letter on woman suffrage and property rights, 1868.


1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9,1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1887 New Jersey School Suffrage Act, enfranchises rural and small town women in school matters, 1887.


Leisure Activities

c. 1880s Annie Oakley (1860-1926), expert sharpshooter and star of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


1892 “Bessie” Holmes Moore (1875-1959), a photograph from an 1892 issue of Harper’s Young People Magazine.


1907 Working Women’s Gymnastic Club, 1907, a Paterson women silk workers’ athletic club.


1909 Alice Huyler Ramsey (1886-1983), a pioneer endurance automobile racer.


1909 Ridgewood High School Women’s Basketball Team, 1909.


Lenape

Lenape Birthing Practices, ca. 1000 to 1650, an illustration of a menstrual hut and other Lenape practices.


Lenape Pottery Making, ca. 1000 to 1650, a modern drawing depicting Lenape women making pottery.


Sarah Kiersted, 17th century, a 1936 painting of Kiersted with Chief Oratam.


1700 Deed of Purchase between Blandina Bayard and the Hackensack Indians, 1700.


1700 Mortar and pestle These stone tools, a well-worn mortar and pestle, were made and used by New Jersey Indians after the time of European settlement, though we do not know where nor by which group.


1710 Map of the Schuyler Patent, by William Bond, 1710 Courtesy, Bergen County Deed Office, Hackensack, NJ Carol Greene, The Region Called Ramapough.


Letters, Correspondence

1800 Letter from Gavin Scott of Elizabethtown to his brother in Alnwich, England, 1800.


1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation. Her letter to the tax assessor, signaling her refusal to pay property taxes, 1858.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


1969 Copy of telegram from Republican Congresswomen Florence Price Dwyer to President Nixon reminding him to release the report of a Task Force on Women, 1969.


Literary Women

1753 “An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady in New York From Her Friend in the Country” by Annis Boudinot Stockton, New Brunswick, 1753.


1783 “To General Washington” by Annis Boudinot Stockton.


1840 Esther “Hetty” Saunders “The Little Wanderer” by Esther “Hetty” Saunders, c. 1793-1862


1843 Jarena Lee (1783-unknown), the first known woman preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.


1864 “My Jersey Blue” by Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899).


1865 Mary Mapes Dodge (1831-1905) Tablet.


1865 “The Tress of Golden Hair,” by Trenton poet Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899), 1865.


c. 1880s Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune (1830-1922), a novelist and writer on household management was known to readers by her pen name, “Marion Harland.”


1892 Julia Keese Nelson Colles’ manuscript about Newark author Mary Mapes Dodge.


c. 1920s Jessie Redmon Fauset (1882-1961), novelist and journalist.


1978 Joyce Carol Oates, noted novelist and essayist, began teaching creative writing at Princeton University in 1978.


2000 Toni Morrison,1993 Noble Prize in Literature and 1998 Pulitzer Prize winning author.


2002 The cover of the eighth novel of best-selling mystery writer Janet Evanovich.


top

Maps

1710 The Schuyler Patent, map by William Bond, 1710.


1897 Support for Women’s School Suffrage By County, 1897


Marriage

1760 Runaway Wives As a British colony, New Jersey was subject to English Common Law and its women, especially married women, were subject to the limitation of rights familiar to women in England.


1852 Married Women’s Property Act, 1852. This was the first New Jersey law reforming married women’s property rights.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9, 1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24, 1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1897 Jennie Tuttle Hobart (1849-1941), c. 1897, when she was Second Lady of the nation during the first administration of William McKinley.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


Medicine

1770 Gravestone for the Infant Children of Isaac and Hannah Arnett.


c. 1850s Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887), an internationally celebrated reformer of care for the mentally ill.


c. 1901 Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901), heroic nurse who lost her life in the battle to eradicate yellow fever.


1917 Delivery Room at Newark After World War I, especially in urban areas, pregnant women increasingly opted for giving birth under the care of a female or male physician in a hospital, rather than at home attended by a midwife or family doctor.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


Memoirs

1775 Diary of Jemima Condict (1754-1779).


1776 Margaret Morris’s Revolutionary War Experience, 1776-1777.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


Midwifery

1917 Delivery Room at the Newark Maternity After World War I, especially in urban areas, pregnant women increasingly opted for giving birth under the care of a female or male physician in a hospital, rather than at home attended by a midwife or family doctor.


Migrant Labor

1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


c. 1950s Alberta Gonzalez (1914-1996), a migrant farm worker and labor leader.


c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


Military

1943 Women workers at the Federal Shipyard, Newark, 1943, sewing safety nets on a destroyer escort.


1943 Ruth Cheney Streeter (1895-1990), the first director of the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve, in military uniform, 1943.


1944 Women in the U. S. Army, 1944, a photograph of WACs at Fort Hancock


c. 1945 Joy Bright Hancock (1898-1986), a military portrait, c. 1945, showing Hancock in her WAVES officers uniform.


1952 Mary Roebling (1905-1994), a reprint of the article “ Banker in High Heels” from the Greater Philadelphia Magazine, July 1952.


Music

1924 Street sign honoring Jazz singer, Sarah Vaughan (1924-1990), in front of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark, New Jersey.


1915 “Don’t Forget the Band Concert,” photo of suffrage campaign band.


1938 American abstract painter, Suzy Frelinghuysen (1911-1988).


Dionne Warwick and the composer Burt Bacharach have collaborated on numerous Grammy Award-winning songs.


Oscar-winning actress Celeste Holm (1919- ) has had a long and productive career in theatre motion pictures and television.


top

Native Americans

17th Century Sarah Kiersted Painting depicts Sarah Kiersted translating for Lenape chief Oratam. Kiersted was a Dutch housvrou in New Netherlands who learned the Lenape language and served Chief Oratam as a translator in his negotiations with Dutch colonists.


1700 Indian Mortar and Pestle These stone tools, a well-worn mortar and pestle, were made and used by New Jersey Indians after the time of European settlement, though we do not know where nor by which group.


1700 Deed of Land Purchase Blandina Kiersted Bayard’s Purchase of Land from the Hackensack Indians, 1700.


1710 The Schuyler Patent Bayard built a house on the Ramapo River, in what is present-day Mahwah, which served as a trading post.


1775 Lenape Birthing This modern drawing illustrates various birthing practices and other customs of Lenape women.


1775 Lenape Pottery This illustration depicts various aspects of pottery making by Lenape women.


Newspapers, Journalism

1760 Runaway Wives As a British colony, New Jersey was subject to English Common Law and its women, especially married women, were subject to the limitation of rights familiar to women in England.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


1797 “To Be Sold,” newspaper advertisement for a slave woman, 1797.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation. Her letter to the tax assessor, signaling her refusal to pay property taxes, 1858.


1867 The Founding Convention of New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24,1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


1892 “Bessie” Holmes Moore (1875-1959), a photograph from an 1892 issue of Harper’s Young People Magazine.


1903 Pillar of Fire, November 25, 1914. Cover of church publication picturing a group of women missionaries.


1913 Bill Haywood Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Haywood comments on women’s role in the strike, 1913.


1920 Pioneer Suffragist Casts G. O. P. Ballot. Newspaper coverage of Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s visit to the polls, 1920.


1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library, 1923.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


1927 Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951). The front page of the New Jersey State Federation News, the newspaper of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, with photograph of Randolph, the founder, and a history of early years of the organization, 1927.


1941 100 Famous Jersey Women, news article about the World Center for Women’s Archives, 1941.


1945 Rachel K. McDowell’s National Federation of Press Women, Inc. membership card, 1945.


1952 Mary Roebling (1905-1994), a reprint of the article “Banker in High Heels” from the Greater Philadelphia Magazine, July 1952.


1963 Press Release from Representative Florence Dwyer’s Office detailing fight for Federal Equal Pay Legislation, 1963.


1972 New Directions for Women, 1972. This is the front page of the second issue, published in the Fall of 1972.


Nursing

1776 Margaret Morris’s Revolutionary War Experience.


1861 Grave of Annie L. Reeder (1825-1904) A nurse at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 4, 1863. Bordentown Cemetery, Bordentown, NJ.


1864 Grave of Arabella Wharton Griffith Barlow (1824-1864), Civil War Nurse. Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, New Jersey.


c. 1901 Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901), heroic nurse who lost her life in the battle to eradicate yellow fever.


1917 Delivery room at the Newark Maternity Hospital, photograph.


c.1920 The Clara Barton School, Bordentown, from a postcard c.1920.


top

Office Work

1895 Women Insurance Workers, Newark, 1895, a photograph of policy writers at Prudential Insurance Company.


top

Painting

c. 1600s Sarah Kiersted, 17th century, a 1936 painting of Kiersted with Chief Oratam.


1776 Oil portrait of Jannetje Drummond Jannetje Vrelandt Drummond, a daughter of prosperous Dutch farmers in Bergen County, was a Loyalist during the Revolutionary War.


1822 Painting of a scrubwomen by Baroness Hyde de Neuville (Anne Marguerite Henriette de Marigny Hyde de Neuville, unknown -1849).

1824 Charlotte Bonaparte’s depiction of Lebanon, New Jersey, 1824.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Waters.

1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1900 Violet Oakley, an important American muralist, was born in Bergen Heights in 1874. She trained at the Arts Students League, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and the Academie Montparnasse in Paris. Oakley created oil paintings, illustrations, stained glass windows and murals. The “Unity” frieze expresses her vision of a peaceful world. She was a pacifist and feminist.


1927 Elsie Driggs, a resident of Lambertville, New Jersey was the only woman artist who participated in the Precisionist Movement in American art, 1927.


1938 American abstract painter, Suzy Frelinghuysen (1911-1988), 1938.


1995 Grace Hartigan, abstract expressionist, 1995.


Performing Arts

c. 1880s Annie Oakley (1860-1926), expert sharpshooter and star of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.


1920 A promotional poster advertising a performance by Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968), innovative dancer and choreographer, 1920.


1924 Street sign honoring Jazz singer, Sarah Vaughan (1924-1990), in front of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark, New Jersey.


1938 American abstract painter, Suzy Frelinghuysen (1911-1988), 1938.


Dionne Warwick and the composer Burt Bacharach have collaborated on numerous Grammy Award-winning songs.


Oscar-winning actress Celeste Holm (1919- ) has had a long and productive career in theatre motion pictures and television.


Philanthropy

c. 1897 Jennie Tuttle Hobart (1849-1941), c. 1897, when she was Second Lady of the nation during the first administration of William McKinley.


c. 1910s Florence Peshine Eagleton, (1870-1953), the first woman to serve as a trustee of Rutgers University.


Poetry

1753 “An Invitation Ode to a Young Lady in New York From Her Friend in the Country” by Annis Boudinot Stockton, New Brunswick, 1753.


1783 “To General Washington” by Annis Boudinot Stockton.


1789 Engraving, Washington’s Reception. Washington’s Reception on the Bridge at Trenton in 1789 on his way to be Inaugurated 1st President of the U.S.


1840 “The Little Wanderer” by Esther “Hetty” Saunders, c. 1793-1862.


1864 “My Jersey Blue” by Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899).


1865 “The Tress of Golden Hair,” by Trenton poet Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899), 1865.


Politicians

1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1947 Mary Norton and the Women of the 80th Congress, 1947.


1956 Florence Price Dwyer (1902-1976), a campaign flyer illustrating the techniques she used to appeal to voters, 1956.


1965 Mildred Barry Hughes (1902-1995), the first woman elected to the New Jersey Senate, 1965.


c. 1970s Helen S. Meyner (1928-1997), Congresswoman from Phillipsburg, meeting constituents, 1970s.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986), ran as a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


1981 Jane Grey Burgio, 1981, New Jersey’s first female secretary of state.


c. 1982 Millicent Hammond Fenwick (1910-1992), United States Congresswoman, c. 1982.


1993 Christine Todd Whitmann (1946-). Campaign flyer, “Christie Whitman’s Blueprint for a Better Education”


Politics, Elective

1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


c. 1917 Antoinette Brown Blackwell, suffragist, c. 1917.


1920 Pioneer Suffragist Casts G. O. P. Ballot. Newspaper coverage of Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s visit to the polls, 1920.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1947 Mary Norton and the Women of the 80th Congress, 1947.


1956 Florence Price Dwyer (1902-1976), a campaign flyer illustrating the techniques she used to appeal to voters, 1956.


1965 Mildred Barry Hughes (1902-1995), the first woman elected to the New Jersey Senate, 1965.


1969 Copy of telegram from Republican Congresswomen Florence Price Dwyer to President Nixon reminding him to release the report of a Task Force on Women, 1969.


c. 1970s Helen S. Meyner (1928-1997), Congresswoman from Phillipsburg, meeting constituents, 1970s.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986) ran as a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


c. 1982 Millicent Hammond Fenwick (1910-1992), United States Congresswoman, c. 1982.


1993 Christine Todd Whitmann (1946-). Campaign flyer, “Christie Whitman’s Blueprint for a Better Education,” 1993.


Professions

1779 Wax model portrait of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, by
Patience Lovell Wright (1725-1786) and historical plaque honoring her.


1843 Jarena Lee (1783-unknown), the first known woman preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.


1844 Carrie Cook Sanborn, nineteenth century Quaker, artist, head of the Cedars Art Colony, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey.


1845 The Lincoln Children, a portrait painted by Susan Catherine Moore Waters. Oil on canvas.


1865 Mary Mapes Dodge (1831-1905) Tablet.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1874 Violet Oakley, an important American muralist, was born in Bergen Heights in 1874.


c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


1920 Promotional poster, Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968).


c. 1920s Elizabeth Coleman White (1871-1954), developer of the nation’s first cultivated blueberry.


1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library, 1923.


1927 “Queensborough Bridge,” by Elsie Driggs (1898 -1992).


c. 1930s Marion Thompson Wright (1902-1962), an African American historian and teacher.


1932 New Jersey Organization of Teachers of Colored Children.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


1937 Dorothy Cross (1906-1974), an expert on the Delaware Indians and Jersey archeology. Photographed here in 1937.


1943 Clara Barton School, Bordentown, New Jersey.


1943 Ruth Cheney Streeter (1895-1990), the first director of the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve, in military uniform, 1943.


1945 Rachel K. McDowell’s National Federation of Press Women, Inc. membership card.


1952 Mary Roebling (1905-1994), a reprint of the article “Banker in High Heels” from the Greater Philadelphia Magazine, July 1952.


1965 “Displaced,” a bronze sculpture by Dorothea Greenbaum (1893 - 1986).


1985 Helen Stummer has been documenting Newark’s Central Ward for many years.


1995 Hon. Marie L. Garibaldi (1934- ), the first woman to serve as a New Jersey Supreme Court Judge.


2001 Portrait of the artist Bernarda Bryson Shahn in her studio.


top

Racial Integration

1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


Religion

1836 Jarena Lee Lee’s autobiography, The Life and Religious Experience of Jarena Lee...(1836) tells about her preaching in several southern New Jersey communities.


1857 Mother Mary XavierMehegan (1825-1915) Mother Mary Xavier Mehegan immigrated from Ireland to New York in 1842.


1903 College of Saint Elizabeth Class of 1903, College of St. Elizabeth.


1914 Pillar of Fire This November 1914 cover from the official publication of the Pillar of Fire church shows women who acted as missionaries for the church.


1927 Florence Spering Randolph Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951) founded the State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs in 1915.


Revolutionary Era

1775 Diary of Jemima Condict. New Jersey Colonists sense the coming conflict with Great Britain and make preparations.


1776 Margaret Morris’s Revolutionary War Experience, 1776-1777.


1776 Memorial honoring the patriotic dead, especially Hannah White Arnett (1733-1823).


1776 Oil portrait of Jannetje Vrelandt Drummond.


1779 Wax model portrait of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, by Patience Lovell Wright (1725-1786) and historical plaque honoring her.


1780 The Ladies of Trenton Assemble. During the Revolutionary War, well-to-do women in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland organized to raise money to help the poorly-financed Continental Army.


1783 “To General Washington” by Annis Boudinot Stockton. A poem sent to George Washington on August 26, 1783, just a few months after the U.S. Congress ratified the provisional Treaty of Paris ending the Revolutionary War


1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells, 1786. The text of the petition of a Bordentown sculptor and widow to the Continental Congress for relief after the Revolutionary War, May 18, 1786.


1789 Engraving of “Washington’s Reception on the Bridge at Trenton.”


1789 Woman’s Silk Ball Gown.


1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a Newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


top

Science

c.1901 Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901), heroic nurse who lost her life in the battle to eradicate yellow fever.


c. 1920s Elizabeth Coleman White (1871-1954), developer of the nation’s first cultivated blueberry.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


1937 Dorothy Cross (1906-1974), an expert on the Delaware Indians and Jersey archeology. Photographed here in 1937.


1958 Dorothy Daggett Eldridge (1903-1986), the founder of the New Jersey Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy.


1968 Science students at Felician College, 1968.


Sculpture

1779 Wax model portrait of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, 1779, by Patience Lovell Wright (1725-1786) and historical plaque honoring her.


1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells. The text of the petition of a Bordentown sculptor and widow to the Continental Congress for relief after the Revolutionary War, May 18, 1786.


1965 “Displaced,” a bronze sculpture by Dorothea Greenbaum (1893 - 1986).


Slavery

1797 “To Be Sold,” newspaper advertisement for a slave woman, 1797.


1806 Certificate of Abandonment, Piscataway Township, New Jersey. This document freed a slave owner from any obligations to the child born to her slave, 1806.


1808 “Manumission of Abigal,” a manuscript document freeing the slave woman Abigal in Piscataway, Middlesex County, 1808.


1828 The Manumission of Ann and Rufus Johnson. Ann and Rufus Johnson were 14 and 15 years old respectively when New Jersey enacted gradual manumission in 1804.


1840 “The Little Wanderer” by Esther “Hetty” Saunders, c. 1793-1862.


Social Reform

c. 1803 Hannah Kinney’s Records of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 1803-1804.


1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


c. 1850s Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887), an internationally celebrated reformer of care for the mentally ill.


1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


c. 1901 The Clara Barton School, Bordentown, from a postcard c.1920.


1903 Newark Female Charitable Society, 1903.


1913 “Some Things Accomplished at Whittier House” 19th annual Report of Whittier House.


1915 Whittier House Playground for children, 1915.


1915 Whittier House Kindergarten Class, 1915.


c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


1923 The New Jersey Republican, April 1923, a cover photo of Juliet Clannon Cushing (1845-1934) being congratulated for the passage of the night work bill.


1928 Whittier House Cooking Class.


1927 Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951). The front page of the New Jersey State Federation News, the newspaper of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, with photograph of Randolph, the founder, and a history of early years of the organization, 1927.


1940 Child Labor on New Jersey Farms, 1940.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952.


1969 Copy of Telegram from Republican Congresswomen Florence Price Dwyer to President Nixon reminding him to release the report of a Task Force on Women, 1969.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


1972 Male and Female Students at Rutgers College, 1972.


Sport and Physical Education

c. 1880s Annie Oakley (1860-1926), expert sharpshooter and star of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.


1892 “Bessie” Holmes Moore (1875-1959), a photograph from an 1892 issue of Harper’s Young People Magazine.


1907 Working Women’s Gymnastic Club, 1907, a Paterson women silk workers’ athletic club.


1909 Alice Huyler Ramsey (1886-1983), a pioneer endurance automobile racer.


1909 Ridgewood High School Women’s Basketball Team, 1909.


1915 Women baseball players advertise woman suffrage, photograph.


c. 1920s Eleanor Egg (1909-), a pioneer woman athlete.


top

Teaching

1844 Carrie Cook Sanborn, nineteenth century Quaker, artist, head of the Cedars Art Colony, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, 1844.


c. 1890 Evelyn College, c. 1890, a photograph of students.


c. 1920 The Clara Barton School, Bordentown, from a postcard c. 1920.


1927 Nellie Morrow Parker (1902-), the first African American school teacher in Bergen County.


c. 1930s Marion Thompson Wright (1902-1962), an African American historian and teacher.


1932 Domestic Science Class. New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, Bordentown.


1932 New Jersey Organization of Teachers. Teachers’ organizations, such as the National Education Association, were not racially integrated until the 1950s.


1837 Hannah Hoyt In 1837, Hannah Hoyt began teaching a group of young girls in a house on lower Albany Street in New Brunswick, New Jersey.


1860 Opheleton Seminary for Young Ladies; Plainfield, 1860.


1952 Racially Integrated Classroom, Berlin Township, 1952. c. 1960s Lena Frances Edwards, MD (1849-1941), physician and presidential Medal of Freedom honoree.


1968 Science students at Felician College, 1968.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


1978 Joyce Carol Oates, noted novelist and essayist, began teaching creative writing at Princeton University in 1978.


2000 Toni Morrison,1993 Noble Prize in Literature and 1998 Pulitzer Prize winning author.


Technology

c. 1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


1917 Delivery Room at Newark After World War I, especially in urban areas, pregnant women increasingly opted for giving birth under the care of a female or male physician in a hospital, rather than at home attended by a midwife or family doctor.


Temperance

1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


Transportation

1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


1909 Alice Huyler Ramsey (1886-1983), a pioneer endurance automobile racer.


top

Utopian Communities

1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1858 Eagleswood House at the Raritan Bay Union, 1858.


top

Woman Suffrage

1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation. Her letter to the tax assessor, signaling her refusal to pay property taxes, 1858.


1867 The Founding Convention of New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1867 “Women Suffrage in New Jersey.” An address delivered by Lucy Stone, at a hearing before the New Jersey Legislature, March 6, 1867.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. A letter on woman suffrage and property rights, 1868.


1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9,1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24,1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1887 New Jersey School Suffrage Act enfranchised rural and small town women in school matters, 1887.


c. 1910s Florence Peshine Eagleton, (1870-1953), the first woman to serve as a trustee of Rutgers University.


1912 Logo of the Women’s Political Union of New Jersey, 1912.


1913 Suffrage Hikers in Newark


1915 “Don’t Forget the Band Concert,” photo of suffrage campaign band, 1915.


1915 “Passing the Suffrage Torch,” photo of suffrage campaign event, 1915.


1915 Statement concerning the opposition of liquor interests to woman suffrage in New Jersey, Women’s Political Union.


1915 Suffragist Mina C. Van Winkle, 1915.


1915 Suffragist petitioning a New Jersey canal worker, photograph, 1915.


1915 Suffragist poll watcher during the 1915 New Jersey referendum.


1915 Table, “1915 Suffrage Referendum, Vote by Counties.”


1915 “Well, Boys, we saved the home,” political cartoon.


1915 Women baseball players advertise woman suffrage, photograph.


1917 Suffragists working to raise money for Liberty Bonds, photograph, 1917.


c. 1917 Antoinette Brown Blackwell, suffragist, c. 1917.


c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


c. 1917 Alice Paul (1885-1979) of Moorestown, militant suffragist.


c. 1917 Alice Paul at National Woman’s Party headquarters, c. 1917.


1918 Julia Hurlbut of Morristown (1882 - 1962), suffragist and relief worker, photograph 1918.


1920 Pioneer Suffragist Casts G. O. P. Ballot. Newspaper coverage of Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s visit to the polls, 1920.


1920 State of New Jersey Senate Concurrent Resolution, No. 1 ratifying the 19th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution granting woman suffrage. 1920.


1918 NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, War-time Address to the 3rd annual convention, 1918.


1920 New Jersey League of Women Voters, minutes of first meeting, 1920.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


Women at Work

1700 Deed of Purchase between Blandina Bayard and the Hackensack Indians, 1700.


1700 NJ Indian Mortar and Pestle .


1828 Painting of a scrubwomen by Baroness Hyde de Neuville (Anne Marguerite Henriette de Marigny Hyde de Neuville, unknown -1849).


1844 Carrie Cook Sanborn, nineteenth century Quaker, artist, head of the Cedars Art Colony, Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey.


1854 Mary Paul’s letter from the North American Phalanx, describes her life and work in the community, 1854.


1861 Grave of Annie L. Reeder (1825-1904) A nurse at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 4, 1863. Bordentown Cemetery, Bordentown, NJ.


1864 Grave of Arabella Wharton Griffith Barlow (1824-1864), Civil War Nurse. Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, New Jersey.


1865 Mary Mapes Dodge (1831-1905) Tablet.


1866 Lily Martin Spencer (1822-1902) painting, “War Spirit at Home,” one of the most popular paintings of the mid-19th century.


1869 Strawberry Fields, Burlington County, 1869, a Harper’s Weekly newspaper illustration.


1874 Violet Oakley, an important American muralist, was born in Bergen Heights in 1874.


1878 Cranberry Bog, Ocean County Pickers at Work; a newspaper illustration from Harper’s Weekly, November 10, 1878.


1885 Morris Canal Workers, 1885, an illustration from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.


1887 Leonora M. Barry’s Report on Women’s Work in New Jersey. The Knights of Labor inspector of women’s work inspects Trenton, Newark, Bordentown, Lambertville and Paterson, 1887.


1890 Women cotton thread workers, c. 1890, an engraving of workers at the Clark Thread Company, Kearney.


1895 Women Insurance Workers, Newark, 1895, a photograph of policy writers at Prudential Insurance Company.


1913 Women Silk Workers, Paterson, 1913.


1913 Elizabeth Gurley Flynn Remembers the Paterson Silk Strike. Flynn recalls strike assemblies and women’s meetings, 1913.


c. 1917 Alice Paul (1885-1979) of Moorestown, militant suffragist.


1917 Delivery Room at Newark After World War I, especially in urban areas, pregnant women increasingly opted for giving birth under the care of a female or male physician in a hospital, rather than at home attended by a midwife or family doctor.


1919 Women Workers at the Edison Factory during World War I supplemented the men from the workforce who were fighting in the war.


1920 Night work for women. In the 1920s, the New Jersey Consumer’s League and the National Consumer’s League, studied the working conditions of women in the state of New Jersey and, in particular, the conditions in the textile mills of Passaic.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library.


1927 “Queensborough Bridge,” by Elsie Driggs.


c. 1932 Rita Sapiro Finkler (1888-1968), path-breaking physician and pioneering endocrinologist.


1932 Domestic Science Class. New Jersey State Manual Training and Industrial School for Colored Youth, Bordentown.


1937 Dorothy Cross (1906-1974), an expert on the Delaware Indians and Jersey archeology. Photographed here in 1937.


1943 Marion Hankins, a member of a World War II aircraft riveting team that helped build TBM Avengers Airplanes.


1943 Women workers at the Federal Shipyard, Newark, 1943, sewing safety nets on a destroyer escort.


1944 Women in the U. S. Army, 1944, a photograph of WACs at Fort Hancock


1947 Mary Norton and the Women of the 80th Congress, 1947.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co. was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


c. 1982 Millicent Hammond Fenwick (1910-1992), United States Congresswoman, c. 1982.


1995 Grace Hartigan, abstract expressionist.


2001 Portrait of Bernarda Bryson Shahn, at 99, by Mel Leipzig.


Women in War Time

1776 Margaret Morris’s Revolutionary War Experience.


1776 Memorial honoring the patriotic dead. Hannah White Arnett . . . Her patriotic words, uttered in the dark days of 1776, summoned discouraged men to keep Elizabethtown loyal to the cause of American independence.”


1776 Oil Portrait of Jannetje Vrelandt Drummond, 1776 Jannetje Vrelandt Drummond, a daughter of prosperous Dutch farmers in Bergen County, was a Loyalist during the Revolutionary War.


1778 “To General Washington” by Annis Boudinot Stockton.


1780 The Ladies of Trenton Assemble.


1786 A Petition by Rachel Lovell Wells.


1861 Grave of Annie L. Reeder (1825-1904) A nurse at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 4, 1863. Bordentown Cemetery, Bordentown, NJ.


1861 Grave of Arabella Wharton Griffith Barlow (1824-1864), Civil War Nurse. Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, New Jersey.


1864 “My Jersey Blue” by Ellen Clementine Howarth (1827-1899).


1917 Suffragists working to raise money for Liberty Bonds.


1918 NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, War-time Address to the 3rd annual convention.


1942 World War II rationing When nationwide food rationing was instituted in the spring of 1942, every New Jersey housewife became part of the World War II home front effort.


1943 Buying Victory Gardens Having a garden became a patriotic act as well as a way to get fresh foods on the table.


1943 Women Workers during war time. Thousands of New Jersey women entered defense work during World War II doing a wide variety of jobs.


1943 Marion Hankins, a member of a World War II aircraft riveting team that helped build TBM Avengers Airplanes, 1943


1943 Ruth Cheney Streeter She was serving as the first woman president of the Morris County Welfare Board when she was appointed director of the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve in 1943.


1944 Mary Nagao Many Japanese American women, men, and children, who had been interned in the Western United States under Executive Order 9066 during World War II, resettled in New Jersey in Upper Deerfield Township to work at Seabrook Farms.


1945 Joy Bright Hancock Joy Bright Hancock (1898-1986), a native of Wildwood, saw temporary duty in the United States Navy in World War I. She joined the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) in World War II, becoming one of its first officers.


Women’s Movement, 1960s-1970s

1969 Copy of telegram from Republican Congresswomen Florence Price Dwyer to President Nixon reminding him to release the report of a Task Force on Women, 1969.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


1972 Male and Female Students at Rutgers College, 1972.


1972 New Directions for Women, 1972. This is the front page of the second issue, published in the Fall of 1972.


Women’s Organizations, Associations, and Clubs

c. 1803 Hannah Kinney’s Records of the Newark Female Charitable Society, 1803-1804.


c. 1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


1846 Martha Washington Salem Union No. 6., Daughters of Temperance, a portion of the charter of an early women’s temperance union, 1846.


1867 The Founding Convention of New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1903 Newark Female Charitable Society, 1903.


c. 1910s Florence Peshine Eagleton, (1870-1953), the first woman to serve as a trustee of Rutgers University.


1912 Logo of the Women’s Political Union of New Jersey, 1912.


1915 Suffragist Mina C. Van Winkle, 1915.


1917 Suffragists working to raise money for Liberty Bonds, photograph, 1917.


1918 NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, War-time Address to the 3rd annual convention, 1918.


1920 New Jersey League of Women Voters, minutes of first meeting, 1920.


1920 “On the Way to the Nightshift,” 1920.


1920 “Day Rest after Night in the Mill,” 1920.


c. 1925 Douglass College Students, c. 1925.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


1926 Strikers’ Children’s Kitchen, Passaic, 1926. Photograph of children outside a relief kitchen during the Passaic woolen strike.


1927 Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951). The front page of the New Jersey State Federation News, the newspaper of the NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, with photograph of Randolph, the founder, and a history of early years of the organization, 1927.


1929 Watchtower, Palisades Interstate Park Several years of lobbying and study by the New Jersey State Federation of Women’s Clubs led to the preservation of the Palisades from commercial development and to the creation of the Palisades Interstate Park Commission by New Jersey and New York.


1932 New Jersey Organization of Teachers of Colored Children.


1938 Memorial Honoring Patriotic... This memorial “honoring the patriotic dead of many wars, . . . especially a noble woman Hannah White Arnett” was erected in 1938 in the cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth, New Jersey, by the Boudinot Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.


1939 Typescript, “Review of Achievements of the NJ League of Women Voters, 1923 - 1939,” 1939.


1945 Rachel K. McDowell’s National Federation of Press Women, Inc. membership card, 1945.


1963 Press Release from Representative Florence Dwyer’s Office detailing fight for Federal Equal Pay Legislation,1963.


c. 1970s Helen S. Meyner (1928-1997), Congresswoman from Phillipsburg, meeting constituents, 1970s.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


1972 Ann Rosensweig Klein (1923-1986), ran as a gubernatorial candidate in the Democratic primary in 1972.


1977 The Women's Political Caucus of New Jersey was created to encourage women's participation in the political process and advocate for women's issues.


Women’s Rights, Employment

c. 1917 Mary Philbrook (1872-1958) became the first New Jersey woman lawyer to gain admittance to the bar in 1895 as a result of an enabling act of the New Jersey legislature.


1923 Newspaper article by Beatrice Winser, director of Newark Public Library, 1923.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


c. 1945 Joy Bright Hancock (1898-1986), a military portrait, c. 1945, showing Hancock in her WAVES officers uniform.


1952 New Jersey Wage Discrimination Act. This act was New Jersey’s first equal pay act, 1952.


1963 Press Release from Representative Florence Dwyer’s Office detailing fight for Federal Equal Pay Legislation, 1963.


1969 Copy of Telegram from Republican Congresswomen Florence Price Dwyer to President Nixon reminding him to release the report of a Task Force on Women, 1969.


1970 Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co. was a landmark case in equal pay for women in the workplace.


1975 “Equity in Educational Programs,” 1975. The text of the regulations published by the New Jersey Department of Education to implement equal education requirements.


Women’s Rights, Married Women

1852 Married Women’s Property Act, 1852. This was the first New Jersey law reforming married women’s property rights.


1857 Report of the Assembly Committee on Women’s Rights, 1857. A response to the petition of Harriet M. LaFetra.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. A letter on woman suffrage and property rights, 1868.


1868 Report of the Judiciary Committee of the New Jersey Assembly, April 9,1868. This report denies the Stone and Blackwell petition for woman suffrage and property rights.


1925 “How New Jersey Laws Discriminate Against Women” flyer published by the National Woman’s Party, 1925.


Women’s Rights, Voting

1760 Runaway Wives As a British colony, New Jersey was subject to English Common Law and its women, especially married women, were subject to the limitation of rights familiar to women in England.


1790 Acts of the Fifteenth General Assembly of New Jersey. This document refers to voters as both “he” and “she,” 1790.


1797 Women at the Polls in New Jersey; a newspaper engraving from 1880 picturing women voting in 1797.


1797 An Act to regulate the election of members of the legislative council and general assembly, sheriffs and coroners, in this State. This act allowed voting by women, 1797.


1807 Acts of the Thirty-second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1807. This act limits voting to free, white, male citizens.


1858 Lucy Stone’s Protest of Taxation Without Representation. Her letter to the tax assessor, signaling her refusal to pay property taxes, 1858.


1867 The Founding Convention of New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association. A newspaper account of the proceedings, 1867.


1867 “Women Suffrage in New Jersey.” An address delivered by Lucy Stone, at a hearing before the New Jersey Legislature, March 6, 1867.


1868 Portia Gage Tries to Vote in Vineland. A description by an early suffragist of her attempt to vote in a municipal election, 1868.


1868 Petition to the New Jersey Legislature from Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. A letter on woman suffrage and property rights, 1868.


1869 The Paterson Daily Press reports on the New Jersey Senate, March 24,1869. According to the report the New Jersey Senate mocks the suffrage petition sent by the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association.


1887 New Jersey School Suffrage Act enfranchised rural and small town women in school matters, 1887.


1912 Logo of the Women’s Political Union of New Jersey, 1912.


1915 “Don’t Forget the Band Concert,” photo of suffrage campaign band, 1915.


1915 “Passing the Suffrage Torch,” photo of suffrage campaign event, 1915.


1915 Suffragist Mina C. Van Winkle, 1915.


1915 Suffragist petitioning a New Jersey canal worker, photograph, 1915.


1915 Suffragist poll watcher during the 1915 New Jersey referendum.


1915 Table, “1915 Suffrage Referendum, Vote by Counties.”


1915 “Well, Boys, we saved the home,” political cartoon.


c. 1917 Antoinette Brown Blackwell, suffragist, c. 1917.


c. 1917 Alice Paul (1885-1979) of Moorestown, militant suffragist.


c. 1917 Alice Paul at National Woman’s Party headquarters, c. 1917.


1920 Pioneer Suffragist Casts G. O. P. Ballot. Newspaper coverage of Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s visit to the polls, 1920.


1920 State of New Jersey Senate Concurrent Resolution, No. 1 ratifying the 19th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution granting woman suffrage. 1920.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


1970 “Women’s March for Equality,” August 26, 1970, a photograph of marchers at the Garden State Plaza, Paramus.


World War I

1918 Julia Hurlbut of Morristown (1882 - 1962), suffragist and relief worker, photograph 1918.


1918 NJ State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs, War-time Address to the 3rd annual convention, 1918.


1919 Women Workers at the Edison Factory during World War I supplemented the men from the workforce who were fighting in the war.


c. 1922-23 Watch Dial Painters, c. 1922-1923, a photograph of workers at the U.S. Radium Corporation in Orange.


1928 Lillian Ford Feickert (1877-1945), president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association, 1912-1920.


World War II

1942 World War II Ration Book and Stamps, 1942.


c. 1943 Buying Victory Garden Seed, c. 1943.


c. 1943 Mary Yamashita Nagao, 1920-1985. Photograph at Manzanar Relocation Center, c. 1943.


1943 Women workers at the Federal Shipyard, Newark, 1943, sewing safety nets on a destroyer escort.


1943 Ruth Cheney Streeter (1895-1990), the first director of the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve, in military uniform, 1943.


1944 Women in the U. S. Army, 1944, a photograph of WACs at Fort Hancock


c. 1945 Joy Bright Hancock (1898-1986), a military portrait, c. 1945, showing Hancock in her WAVES officers uniform.


1952 Mary Roebling (1905-1994), a reprint of the article “Banker in High Heels” from the Greater Philadelphia Magazine, July 1952.


top
top
Translate »