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    Hinchcliffe Stadium

    Eleanor Marie (Egg) Kratiger, known as Eleanor Egg, began her track and field career with the Paterson Girls’ Recreation Program in 1923.

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    Memorial Day Nursery

    The Memorial Day Nursery survives as one of the last standing legacies to Jennie Tuttle Hobart’s benevolence, and is perhaps the earliest known day care center in the United States still operating today. The architect was Henry Bacon (who designed the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C.).

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    Lambert Castle Museum

    Jennie Tuttle Hobart was a prominent philanthropist, community leader and anti-suffragist. She was the wife of Garrett A. Hobart, who served as Vice President under President William McKinley.

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    La Voce Italiana Newspaper Office

    Mary Augusto was a journalist, community leader and the first woman mayoral candidate in Paterson. She was active from pre-WWII until her death in 1982. In the 1930s, she and her husband decided to start the Italian-language newspaper La Voce Italiana.

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    The Phoenix Mill

    Paterson gained its preeminence as the “Silk City” in the later 19th century. Turn-of-the-century female silk workers were typically young, single and either immigrants or daughters of immigrants. They worked 10-hour days to contribute to the family well-being or provided the sole support for their families.

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    Barbour Mill Spruce Street

    By the turn of the 20th century, Paterson was a leading city in the industrial revolution, and as a consequence became a hotbed of both labor-movement reforms and disputes. Paterson’s industrial economy was dominated by textiles, especially silk, others as well as flax and linen produced by the Barbour Company.

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    The Botto House

    The Botto House, the home of immigrant silk worker Maria Botto (1870-1915), became a popular meeting place for Sunday outings by fellow silk workers from nearby Paterson and a focal point for striking workers during the 1913 Paterson silk strike.